Seasoned buyers and first-time buyers agree both cited views and chef kitchens as the most important luxury-home features, according to a survey. Getty Images Seasoned home buyers—people who described themselves as owning a high-end luxury home —approach the purchasing process much differently than those venturing into the high-end market for the first time, according to an online survey conducted by Realtor.com in March. These experienced high-end buyers focus less on extra space and glitzy home features and more are willing to pay over their budget to get a sound investment. Generally, seasoned luxury buyers look at the long-term prospects for a property, says Christian Benites, associate real-estate broker with Town Residential in New York. Still, seasoned buyers and first-time buyers agree on some things. They both cited views and chef kitchens as the most important luxury-home features, according to the survey. Seasoned folks saw luxury pools as third most important, whereas

Lobster & crab salad, one of my favorites. (at Villa Blanca)

Lobster & crab salad, one of my favorites. (at Villa Blanca)

Rodeo Drive traffic jam. (at Rodeo Drive)

Rodeo Drive traffic jam. (at Rodeo Drive)

The sun is out and who want to go for a swim? (at Bel Air Crest)

The sun is out and who want to go for a swim? (at Bel Air Crest)

Happy Wednesday from LA!

Happy Wednesday from LA!

Who love Jeannie?

Who love Jeannie?

 In Celebration of Earth Day Today 15 Tips To Make Your Home More Green. Imagine a world where every home is powered by the sun. Where every raindrop waters the yard, even on dry days. Where trash is turned into fertilizer, which is used to grow produce. This isn’t science fiction; it can be done today. Here are 15 things you can do to lessen your home’s impact on the environment, ordered by least expensive to most expensive (but most impactful). Why does it matter? According to Energy.gov, homes and commercial buildings consume 40 percent of the energy used in the United States, the majority of which comes from fossil fuels. According to EPA.gov, the average family of four can use 400 gallons of water every day. Homes also pollute the environment; fertilizers, pesticides, automobile fluids, paint, trash, animal waste and other pollutants can end up in the storm drain system that flows into rivers, harbors and the ocean. Making your home more green can reduce waste and minimiz

Being that it is Earth Day, what better place to have a client meeting than at the Hotel Bel Air amidst the beauty of nature. One is the hidden gems of LA! (at Hotel Bel Air)

Being that it is Earth Day, what better place to have a client meeting than at the Hotel Bel Air amidst the beauty of nature. One is the hidden gems of LA! (at Hotel Bel Air)

This Earth Day I thank the oceans, the clouds, the sky and the trees for the life they give us! #earthday  (at Turtle Beach)

This Earth Day I thank the oceans, the clouds, the sky and the trees for the life they give us! #earthday (at Turtle Beach)

Study says off-MLS deals cost home sellers big bucks Analysis finds MLS-marketed single-family homes sell for 23 percent more Andrea V. Brambila Associate Editor share this article Apr 18, 2014 Cash image via Shutterstock. In 2013, the average single-family home seller in San Francisco who kept his or her property off the local multiple listing service left more than $200,000 on the table. That’s according to a study by San Francisco agents Matt Fuller and Britton Jackson of Zephyr Real Estate. After reading tips from Clareity’s Matt Cohen about how to figure out the share of “pocket listings” in their market, Fuller and Jackson decided to do their own analysis using data from the San Francisco Association of Realtors MLS and — through a tax reporting service — the San Francisco Assessor-Recorder’s Office. “As Realtors in San Francisco we have a professional interest in making sure we are fulfilling our fiduciary duty to our clients. We’ve heard arguments both for